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battle plan for auditors

How to Be Productive With Your Job Hunt

There’s no getting around it: hunting for jobs is a pain. It’s time consuming, stressful and occasionally disheartening. Worst of all, it’s easy to lose focus, potentially keeping you unemployed for even longer.

However, there are certain steps you can take to be more productive with your job hunt and avoid losing focus. You’ve probably heard this before, but just in case: when you’re unemployed and searching for a job, you need to think of your job search as your full-time job. Treating your search this way makes it much more likely to yield results.

Here are some tips that you should consider:

  • Plan out your days. Just as you would with an average work day, plan out what your days look like while on the job hunt. You might reserve certain days for networking sessions, or set aside blocks of hours looking job huntingfor jobs online. You should also reserve time to tweak your resume, fill out applications, write letters, etc. Stay organized with your planning so that you start to get yourself into a routine; that makes it much easier to stay focused.
  • Track everything. Keep a thorough spreadsheet of all your job seeking activities. Track the jobs that you’ve applied for, when you applied for them, who your contact person was and when you followed up. You should also track all of the networking contacts you’ve made and when you had correspondence with them. Update this spreadsheet regularly to make sure that you’re staying organized.
  • Take advantage of technology. Use social networking or job hunting sites to your advantage. Many of them even have email alert systems when jobs that match your searches or your qualifications show up. You can get alerts as soon as listings are posted, so you can have an inside track on applications.
  • Revise your resume and cover letter for each application. You won’t find great results if you use the same generic resume and cover letter for every position you pursue. Research the target organization and what they’re looking for in an applicant so you have a better understanding of how to frame your application materials.
  • Keep your schedule arranged like you would at work. Get up early, stay well groomed and dressed, take lunch breaks and call an end to your job hunting activities by a certain time of the day. This will make your transition into your eventual new job a lot easier, and also keep you more productive during your search.

Getting that important work position is critical. Take these and other steps that each increase the probability of a successful pursuit. Good hunting!

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

transition anxiety

Transition Anxiety

We’re moving in a few weeks to an apartment that is about half the size of our current home. This move is consistent with what we both want: more flexibility, less debt, much more opportunity intellectually and for both of our small businesses, a potentially wider circle of friends, and most of all – the springboard to the next phase in our lives together.

There are so many positives that will come with this move. But there’s a great deal of uncertainty as well. Anxiety is what I think the mental health professionals might call it.

You see, we love where we live. The beautiful mountains of Colorado greet us every morning and provide cool nights for deep sleeping year round. Sunshine and minimal humidity are the norm. And we have nested moving to denvercomfortably in the home we completed and decorated together.

On the flip side, we face between 6 and 10 hours each week just driving to and from the Denver airport. That’s a full productive day lost every week year round just sitting in the car. In addition, last winter’s storms were brutal for highway driving, and the constant construction delays the rest of the year have finally worn us down.

So we move. Towards something…Better!

That’s my favorite word. Better!

Moving Towards Better

We all face transitions every day. Most are small – meetings, schedules, decisions, new tasks at work and at home. Many of us – perhaps you – are in the midst of major transitions as well. New jobs, new cities, new families, new life responsibilities.

At a recent conference, we were discussing why it is so hard to make decisions and take action – especially when those decisions and actions have a high likelihood of making things Better! The discussion leader cut to the better lifechase and reminded us of what we all knew in our gut – that for humans the most comfortable path is the status quo.

Certainly there is comfort in the familiar and certain in our lives. And changes both small and large can bring equal layers of tension and anxiety. Uncertainty about the future will do that. Especially if you are blessed as we are with a wonderful home life in a beautiful setting as a starting point.

But change is necessary for growth. My wonderful bride Kris and I know that, so we are pushing forward together towards what we know is simply…Better!

What Changes Do You Know You Need to Make?

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”