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how to establish influence at a new job

How to Establish Influence at a New Job

So you’ve got a new job. Congrats! But now you face the challenge of adapting to your new workplace and building your reputation and influence within the organization. This can be a pretty daunting task to even the most seasoned supervisors and employees, but it’s important that you dive right in and start carving out your role and reputation without delay.

As you concentrate on mastering the tasks required during the first few weeks of your new position, it’s important that you also gain an understanding of how the organization works as whole and determine the cultural dynamics of the workforce. This will help you gain momentum quickly as you work to build legitimate influence and provide measurable value in your new position.

Here are some tips for doing just that:

1. Become the go-to person for whatever you do

When you introduce yourself to other people within your new organization, you should establish yourself as an authority in your position and offer to be of assistance. When you make the introduction, explain what your role and responsibilities are and why others should come to you when they need assistance with something in your realm of expertise. Once you’ve build yourself up as an authority in one particular area, people will start establish influence at a new jobseeking you out for assistance even in areas outside of your job description. The goal is to be in demand because of how good you are at whatever you do.

2. Make friends in high places

Seek out people who are well respected in your new organization This person could be your direct superior, a project manager or others who are well respected regardless of their position or length of service. Arrange time to chat, and let them know that you’d love to have their advice as you acclimate to your new position. Having an influential person in a mentorship or coaching role will help you to build your skills and influence. Start with your new boss; it’s always a good idea to find ways to help them meet or exceed their goals.

3. Really listen to coworkers

Get to know your coworkers and their goals, challenges, and responsibilities. Find ways to help them be successful. Go out of your way to help them when they need assistance. You can only build influence if you have the admiration and respect of the people that you work with. But remember: this isn’t about building paybacks due to you; it’s about being seen as an invaluable resource.

4. Invest constantly in your most important product – YOU

Work each day on improving your skills in these critical areas.

  • Core business, administrative and time management skills
  • Technical skills required of your current position and desired future positions
  • Interpersonal and communications skills

All three areas are critical to your success. Study, practice, ask for help, and improve every day. Let others will see how dedicated you are to mastering your number one product – YOU!

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

How to Make the Most of a Bad Job Situation

How to Make the Most of a Bad Job Situation

Even with an improving economy, there’s still a lot of press about how hard it is to find a good, full-time job: a job that fulfills us and provides financial confidence for ourselves and our families. Too many good hard-working people are stuck having to deal with jobs they dislike and can barely bring themselves to do every single day.

There are no guarantees, but we can improve the probability that something Better! will come along with a few simple steps.

  • Focus on other people. If it’s the actual work at your job that you dislike, try to connect with other people at your company. Show them what a positive person you are. Be easy to be around. Good relationships with your colleagues and supervisors can often make bad situations Job Situationmuch more bearable. Be sure to look outside your department as well. Find a small group you can spend some time talking to. Not complaining, just talking.
  • Speak up. If you’ve built a positive relationship with your supervisor but often wind up with tasks that you just can’t stand doing, ask for some time to speak to your boss and let him or her know what you don’t like about the work you’re given. Be positive in your words and be prepared to offer specific solutions. Perhaps the two of you can work out a situation that allows you to avoid some of the work you dislike so much. And if you don’t have a positive relationship with your supervisor, why not start right there!
  • Keep it light. Find ways to try to squeeze some appropriate humor into your everyday routine. At least smile. This will help you to pass the time and will hopefully have a positive response within your office.
  • Enjoy yourself outside of work. As much as you can, try not to take your work home with you. Keep busy with positive outside activities. Enjoy your friends and family so that you don’t have to spend your time outside of work feeling down about your job. Balance is the key.
  • Keep your options open. Block the time to polish your resume, check for job openings and attend networking events. The search for something Better! will help give you a light at the end of the tunnel. Take positive action to move your career towards that potentially Better! place.

Teddy Roosevelt had this great advice for any life situation: “Do what you can, with what you’ve got, right where you are.”

Make the most of a bad job situation while working proactively towards something Better! NEVER give up the goal of having work that you enjoy.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”