Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /home/johnhall/public_html/johnhallspeaker.com/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-seo-premium/frontend/class-frontend.php on line 1086
social_icon__apple
social_icon__behance
social_icon__bitbucket
social_icon__blogger
social_icon__dribble
social_icon__dropbox
social_icon__facebook
social_icon__flickr
social_icon__github
social_icon__googleplus
social_icon__googleplay
social_icon__instagram
social_icon__linkedin
social_icon__pinterest
social_icon__skype
social_icon__tripadvisor
social_icon__tumblr
social_icon__twitter
social_icon__vimeo
social_icon__youtube
Closeup portrait of young couple, man and woman ; one being excited, smiling, showing thumbs up, other serious, concerned, unhappy showing thumbs down, isolated on white background. Emotion contrasts

Better! Results Idea #5: Respect Opinions – Seek Facts

“You can have your own opinions, but you can’t have your own facts.” This well-worn line has been used by politicians for decades. In reply I say, “Amen. I hear you. I agree.”

There’s a big difference between opinion and facts. Both have their place in pursuing our goals. Opinions and preferences provide the emotional soul needed to set goals and advance confidently in their direction. Facts are the solid foundation we build on as we take action. In chasing our dreams, opinions are important, but facts are critical.

Facts are objective. They are honest. They are proven. They are true. And they are absolutely required when evaluating action options. Do you agree?

Consider these questions.

In your work life, have you looked at what has provided consistently positive outcomes in the lives of anyone you identify as successful? Specifically, what specific action steps do they take each day? How and when do they act? And just as Headshot beautiful woman with puzzled face expression and question marks above her head looking up, isolated grey wall background. Human emotions, feelings, body language, problem solution conceptimportant, what do they avoid doing?

In your relationships, do you research what has been proven by experts to produce the best results in communicating with your spouse, partner, children or parents? Or do you rely on your gut feel, emotions and ‘energy state’ at the moment?

In your thinking, brainstorming and decision-making, do you perform research of the results obtained by others on a similar path before plunging into a plan of action? Do you strive to objectively evaluate the benefits and risks of alternatives?

Do you have sources of truth and fact in the key areas of your life? Family, friends and co-workers you can depend on to tactfully tell you the truth no matter the issue? Objective coaches and mentors you lean on for business planning, decisions and action?

Stoke your passion and let it motivate you to move confidently forward. But find critical balance in reliable sources of truth and fact all along the way.

Find your own reliable sources of truth. In business, in the news, in politics, in your relationships, and especially in taking action toward your goals.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

bad boss

The Biggest Signs that You are a Bad Boss

Oh boy. This is a subject that people never really want to talk about, but if you can’t pinpoint where the problems lie in your business that prevent it from really flourishing, it might be time to analyze yourself.

When you’re the boss in any organization, you’re almost never going to have universal popularity. However, there are some characteristics that you can avoid that should help you avoid being a bad boss.

Here are some of the most common traits that may indicate you’re a bad boss:

  • People are afraid to give you their opinions. You need to be able to have constant lines of communication open with all of your employees. If people are afraid to talk to you, that may very well be because they bad bossare scared of your response, or that you have a reputation for being less than willing to have these discussions.
  • You tend to micromanage. You shouldn’t have to constantly be on your employees’ case to ensure they achieve results. When you feel like you constantly need to be a whip cracker, this may mean that you’ve hired the wrong people or you haven’t properly motivated them, or both. In any case, it’s your fault.
  • You are out of touch. The best managers have their finger on the pulse of their business at all times. You should know what’s going on in all areas of your organization. If you don’t know what’s happening inside, how can you convince other people outside that you’re a great organization?
  • You try too hard to be liked at the expense of respect. You’re just about never going to have universal popularity. It’s great if people love you and enjoy working with you, but it’s more important that you are respected as a leader. You need to be able to build the trust of your employees and deliver tough messages when they need to be heard. It can’t always be sunshine and roses.
  • You throw your employees under the bus. When things go wrong, you can’t avoid taking responsibility. As the boss, you need to take the blame when things go wrong, even when it’s not completely your fault. You also need to pass the credit when things go well. Throwing your team members under the bus will only serve to make them despise you.

Fortunately, all of these behaviors are fixable. If you find that you are guilty of any of these characteristics, it’s never too late to make a conscious effort to change your ways. Your business will be far better because of it.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”