Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /home/johnhall/public_html/johnhallspeaker.com/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-seo-premium/frontend/class-frontend.php on line 1086
social_icon__apple
social_icon__behance
social_icon__bitbucket
social_icon__blogger
social_icon__dribble
social_icon__dropbox
social_icon__facebook
social_icon__flickr
social_icon__github
social_icon__googleplus
social_icon__googleplay
social_icon__instagram
social_icon__linkedin
social_icon__pinterest
social_icon__skype
social_icon__tripadvisor
social_icon__tumblr
social_icon__twitter
social_icon__vimeo
social_icon__youtube
Your Past Is Not Your Future

Your Past Is Not Your Future – Better! Results Tip #2

10 Steps to a Better Career | Interested in a new career? Ready to leap for that next promotion? If so, it is important to take the time to evaluate your present situation, to explore career options and to choose a career that will be satisfying for you. CLICK THE IMAGE TO LEARN MORE

Terri Said, “I’ll never be able to get the top spot here. Pursuing goals like that just isn’t part of where I come from.”

Yikes! What a limiting statement to have about yourself and your abilities. And it certainly caused an abrupt change in our performance coaching conversation.

Of course Terri could get the top spot. There are no guarantees, but there are steps she can take every day to increase the probability of that happening. To position herself for success however she defines it.

But if her starting point is a deep-seated believe that she can’t or won’t ever be able to because of where she comes from, she’s pretty much dead in the water before taking the first step.

Building on Where We’re From

We all come from somewhere. We all have many pluses and minuses in our background. Family, friends, health, nationality and race, beliefs, finances, language, education, contacts and a thousand other factors. All are the foundation points from which we jump forward – that is, if we choose to jump.

Here are two of my favorite quotes on this topic. Both frame this issue with great clarity and precision.

First, from Brendon Burchard at his High Performance Academy seminar I attended in the spring of 2015:

Your background is your starting point. No more or less.

The second quote from Dr. Wayne W. Dyer has traveled with me for many years:

Your past is not your future – unless you want it to be.

Two great insights from two great thought leaders. Brendon is young and energetic. One of the great motivators and influencers of our age. Dr. Dyer – who had more influence on my thinking than any other human except my parents – passed on in late 2015. But not before leaving us with the wisdom of the ages.

If you’re giving me the honor of reading my articles or attending my Webinars or live events, I’m giving you a hard shove right now to invest a few precious moments of Internet research on both of these interesting men.

Your Call To Action

Let’s pledge together to draw a line in our lives that distinguishes the before, the now, and the yet to be.

Let’s acknowledge and celebrate our past as the foundation for future success.

Let’s take stock of where we are right now: our strengths, weaknesses, bright spots and blind spots.

Let’s leave behind once and for all the limiting beliefs and distracting habits that draw us in like quicksand and do nothing more than hold us back.

Then let’s choose to carry forward the positive habits, beliefs and other factors from our past that will serve us in the future as we pursue our goals.

One last quote as a tribute to Dr. Dyer:

“If you focus on what’s always been, it will always be.

Focus instead on what could be.”

Let’s explore ‘what could be’ together. Let me know how I can help.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 38-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

better results tip

Everyone Wants One Thing – Better Results Tip #1

Right now, make a choice. Decide on just one thing that you believe everyone wants. And the answer has to be just one word.

When I was first confronted by that powerful question by my results coach, I sat silently for a full five minutes before coming to an answer. That was over five years ago, and I’m still comfortable that I picked the right word: BETTER!

Better! allows us to acknowledge that we are fine – if in fact we are. But it also gives us permission to go higher. And it can be applied to any personal or professional goal. Be a Better! parent, mentor, priest, engineer, teacher, student, employee or manager.

Better! allows the novice and beginner to learn and grow massively, and it allows the master to seek and deploy the little tweaks to what they already do so well to arrive at even BETTER! results.

So for the last five years, I’ve worked to make Better! my theme – especially in my work. And I challenge you to consider the same test I’m applying each day. It’s a short but powerful question:

Am I Better! today than last week, last month, or last year?

Of course, the devil is always on the details. For example, am I a better speaker, performance coach or consultant than I was a few months ago? Am I a better spouse? A better neighbor? Am I healthier than I was at this time last year? Am I more energized?

What about you? What would be your criteria, and how would you assess where you are?

Which brings me to my purpose in writing to you. You see, where we are is only relevant as the jumping off point to where we want to be. Do you want to be a Better! manager, parent, neighbor or partner? Do you want better health, enhanced energy, more financial security, or any other personal or professional goal?

If so, join me in a journey as together we consider exactly how we’ll get the Better! results we seek. Let’s pursue how we could be better next week than this week. Better next month than this month. Better next year than right now. On whatever goals you have in mind. New, heightened and sustained levels. Increased capacity, desire, potential and energy.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 38-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

How Visualization Will Help You Attain Your Goals

How Visualization Will Help You Attain Your Goals

We’ve all sent or received a destination postcard. Vivid pictures of the Grand Canyon, a beach in North Carolina, the Rocky Mountains, or the Chicago skyline. Just enough room on the back for a sentence or two – ‘Wish you were here’ being the #1 sentiment.

Visualization works pretty much the same way with one important difference. It doesn’t show a picture of where you are. It creates a vivid mental picture of where you’re going. It simple, powerful and it works. Let’s give it a try.

Just close your eyes and imagine you have achieved your goals. Create a picture in your mind of exactly what that looks like. Add the where, when and all of the colorful details of your goal. Fill in as much as possible. Pretend you are already there. Don’t just imagine it. Sense it; feel it.

When it comes to achieving our goals, visualization is perhaps one of the greatest tools we have on the road to success. Visualization doesn’t mean you’re playing pretend, it means you are picturing yourself already reaching an objective.

Harnessing the power of visualization and using this image to guide your day-to-day routine can have a significant impact on your life. It guides our actions. Here’s how.

With every decision you make each day, you can ask simple questions with your goal-vision as a guide. Simple decision-moment questions like, “Which path will lead me towards my intended destination?” Here are a few examples:

• As you order lunch from the menu, you can ask, “Which selection brings me closer to my goal of health and fitness?”

How Visualization Will Help You Attain Your Goals

The Do What You Can System meets you where you are. It guides and inspires you as you move through an easy, 6-step process. Follow The System, and you’ll achieve real results, both personally and professionally.

• As you prepare for a meeting, you can ask, “What should I do right now to bring value to everyone present and as a result informally recruit others to support me in my career goals?”
• As you walk in the door at home after a long day of work, you can ask “How should I greet my spouse, partner or children right now? What should I say or do to advance towards my vision of a great relationship and happy family live?”

When we make plans for our personal lives or our business, it’s important to do more than simply set goals. We have to believe these goals are attainable. Visualizing your goal gives you a preview of what your accomplishment will feel like. It strengthens your ability to believe in yourself. By imagining what it will look and feel like to reach a goal, we constantly remind ourselves that we have the potential to reach success.

Once you have your specific goal in mind, take the next step of creating a clear vision. Use your mind to build a vivid picture of what your success looks like, feels like and even what it sounds or smells like. Spare no detail in how you imagine your achievement. When you have a clear picture of your goal, store that visualization in your mind. As you take small, daily steps toward your objective, remember how each task fits into your path to success.
 

 

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

Navigating a Major Transition in Your Personal Path

Navigating a Major Transition in Your Personal Path

Transitions are a natural part of life. As we make our way through each day, we adapt to minor or ‘micro’ changes by being flexible and making simple decisions in the mood of the moment. What to eat, what to wear, what to say and how to say it are decisions we make with little if any conscious thought. But life-changing ‘macro’ changes call for planning, analysis, opportunity and risk. These major life changes require serious decisions that have long-term effects.

Major life transitions involve changes that we perceive as positive or negative, and can occur in almost any area of our lives. Examples of major transitions include moving to a new city or country, choosing a collage (and a field of study!), starting a family, changing careers, getting married, and many, many more.

These major life transitions challenge us to adapt to new situations, and can be a catalyst that drives us toward our goals for a better life – if we see them in the proper light.

If you find yourself approaching navigating a major life change, keep the following tips in mind.

Navigating a Major Transition in Your Personal Path

Far from shallow cheer leading, this straightforward system guides you through an easy process to clarify what you want to do and expand what you can do – wherever you are, right now, and wherever you wish to be.

Set and Understand Your Core Priorities. What is most important to you? Answering this question will provide you with a clear vision of your values. Values and beliefs determine priorities, and priorities drive important decisions and behaviors. Knowing and following your priorities will leave you better equipped to make action decisions that are in line with your goals.

Seek the Opportunity in Major Life Change. We’ve all heard the expression that attitude is everything. When we look for opportunities in major transitions – especially when they are not transitions we choose on our own – we can be more open to accepting and embracing change. For example, if your employer relocates you from Kansas to California, reframe the loss of friends and familiar routines left behind. View the situation as an opportunity to advance your career, trade in your winter clothes, make new friends, and take surfing lessons. And watching the sunset on the beach any night you choose is a life opportunity of great value! There’s always risk, anxiety and uncertainty in major change. But there’s equal measure of opportunity as well, if we are open to seeing it.

Reevaluate Your Goals. Navigating a major transition is a great time to re-examine goals. Start by asking how your current goals fit with your new situation. If you are unclear on how to move toward your vision of success, it may be the perfect time to create new goals that spring naturally from the new opportunities that major life changes present.

The choices we make when presented with major life transitions have the ability to reshape our priorities, explore new opportunities, and set new goals. Try to seek out the potential in each new situation, and understand how it can work for you, not against you. Then move forward with renewed purpose in the direction of your stepped-up goals.

 

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

Beating the habit | What Excuses Do You Use?

Beating the habit | What Excuses Do You Use?

Are you lying to yourself?

Chances are there are areas of your life you would love to improve. Goals you’ve set. Dreams that keep popping up. Visions of success on your terms. But if it’s been weeks or months since your last real action toward a long-standing goal, it’s time to evaluate why.

As we all work toward achieving our goals, it’s important that we aren’t caught in a cycle of self-deception. If we are constantly thinking “I probably can’t handle that,” it’s only a matter of time before we start believing it.

And how often do we all tell ourselves white lies and excuses that have the potential to drain our motivation. In an instant, our excuses can snowball from a moment of self-doubt or uncertainty about next steps to a concrete perception of our limited abilities. A simple excuse that turns into a limiting belief can prevent you from chasing your goals. In the short term, excuses damage our self-confidence and cause us to ignore an opportunity. In the long term, excuses create major barriers that prevent us from clarifying our priorities and achieving success.

Beating the habit

Beating the habit | What Excuses Do You Use?

“Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are.”
The beauty of this system is that you can change any area of your life: professional, financial, physical, spiritual, interpersonal, intellectual, or psychological. You’ll be amazed at what you can do!

If you’re tired of making excuses that limit your potential, if you’re tired of thinking you’re not good enough, too old, or too young to make progress, you have the power to start over – every day. Each morning presents a new opportunity to get back on track with your purpose in life. Beating the habit of making excuses requires work, but the payoff includes releasing yourself from the barriers that hold you back.

It’s time for us all to stop making excuses. Right now, take a moment to think about any negative messages you send yourself on a daily basis. Consider how they impact your family, friendships, work and all areas of your life.

For example, your excuse could be that you don’t exercise because you don’t have anyone willing to join you for a workout. This excuse may affect your level of energy at work, or influence your relationships with loved ones who want to see you healthy. But we don’t need someone at our side to go for a 20-minute walk. We don’t need music in our earphones or texting on our handheld devices. We don’t need special clothes or the latest athletic shoes. We just need to walk. No excuses; just get up and go. In fact, the peace and quiet that is a gift to you as you stroll along by yourself will almost certainly release energy and ideas hiding just behind your excuses.

Once we identify our excuses and push them aside, replace that space by seeing opportunities to help you achieve your goal. Without excuses blocking our view, we’ll see the people, information, and other resources we need to chase our goals. They were always there. Excuses just prevented us from seeing them.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

next page