Navigating a Major Transition in Your Personal Path

Navigating a Major Transition in Your Personal Path

Transitions are a natural part of life. As we make our way through each day, we adapt to minor or ‘micro’ changes by being flexible and making simple decisions in the mood of the moment. What to eat, what to wear, what to say and how to say it are decisions we make with little if any conscious thought. But life-changing ‘macro’ changes call for planning, analysis, opportunity and risk. These major life changes require serious decisions that have long-term effects.

Major life transitions involve changes that we perceive as positive or negative, and can occur in almost any area of our lives. Examples of major transitions include moving to a new city or country, choosing a collage (and a field of study!), starting a family, changing careers, getting married, and many, many more.

These major life transitions challenge us to adapt to new situations, and can be a catalyst that drives us toward our goals for a better life – if we see them in the proper light.

If you find yourself approaching navigating a major life change, keep the following tips in mind.

Navigating a Major Transition in Your Personal Path

Far from shallow cheer leading, this straightforward system guides you through an easy process to clarify what you want to do and expand what you can do – wherever you are, right now, and wherever you wish to be.

Set and Understand Your Core Priorities. What is most important to you? Answering this question will provide you with a clear vision of your values. Values and beliefs determine priorities, and priorities drive important decisions and behaviors. Knowing and following your priorities will leave you better equipped to make action decisions that are in line with your goals.

Seek the Opportunity in Major Life Change. We’ve all heard the expression that attitude is everything. When we look for opportunities in major transitions – especially when they are not transitions we choose on our own – we can be more open to accepting and embracing change. For example, if your employer relocates you from Kansas to California, reframe the loss of friends and familiar routines left behind. View the situation as an opportunity to advance your career, trade in your winter clothes, make new friends, and take surfing lessons. And watching the sunset on the beach any night you choose is a life opportunity of great value! There’s always risk, anxiety and uncertainty in major change. But there’s equal measure of opportunity as well, if we are open to seeing it.

Reevaluate Your Goals. Navigating a major transition is a great time to re-examine goals. Start by asking how your current goals fit with your new situation. If you are unclear on how to move toward your vision of success, it may be the perfect time to create new goals that spring naturally from the new opportunities that major life changes present.

The choices we make when presented with major life transitions have the ability to reshape our priorities, explore new opportunities, and set new goals. Try to seek out the potential in each new situation, and understand how it can work for you, not against you. Then move forward with renewed purpose in the direction of your stepped-up goals.

 

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

fitness club indoor with blue pilates balls in background

Better! Results Idea #8: Get A Little Exercise

treadmill2 PM, and I’ve been sitting at my desk since early this morning. Two cups of coffee, and a very short lunch break. The project deadline is just a few days away, and I’m feeling stuck, lethargic, and totally un-creative. Time to give myself the free gift of a walk around the block. I know when I get back in five minutes, everything will flow smoothly again.

I love to play – basketball, ride my bike, snowboard, canoe. Anything that feels like a game. But I HATE to exercise – go to a gym, sit on a stationary bike, lift weights, run the treadmill. HATE is a strong ugly word. But I’m sticking with it!

I know exercise is good for me. Exercise tunes up the body. Exercise makes the blood flow to the brain and everywhere else. Exercise flushes the toxic. Exercise increases creativity.

I know all of this, but still I have a history of resisting exercise if it doesn’t involve ‘playing’ in even a small way.

So here’s what I do – and I challenge you to play along with me.

I walk. At least one mile every day. That takes about 20 minutes. And to make it a game, I keep a log on a very basic Excel spreadsheet. Every day, I know whether I’m ahead or behind. If I skipped yesterday, I do two miles today. If I get Sporty female doing excercise outsideahead, sometimes I’ll give myself a day off as a reward. I start on January 1 and keep it going until December 3. 365 miles per year, one day at a time.

On pleasant days, I’ll walk through the neighborhood – ten minutes out, turn around and ten minutes back. In bad weather and while traveling, I’ll walk in client offices, hotel hallways, airport terminals, shopping centers, and college classroom buildings. I intentionally park at the far side of shopping centers and airport economy parking lots, and walk in. Our town-home has 42 steps from the basement to my workspace. I bet I walk 500 steps up every day I’m home.

So simple, even I can do it! And you can too. That’s my challenge to you: to walk one mile with me every day for a year.

Of course, if you regularly engage in more serious exercise, bless you! Continue on your mission to stay fit, healthy and happy. But if you’re a victim of long hours sitting at a desk, there are no worthy excuses to avoid starting today and walking for just 20 minutes. Twice around your office building or the city bock where you live should do it.

The subtitle for my first book “Do What You Can!” is “Simple Steps – Extraordinary Results”. I didn’t write that tag line, a very creative professional writer did. But I love it just the same, and it has become a major theme in my work and personal life. Simple steps. Why not get up right now and literally take a few simple steps. In 20 minutes, you’ll log your first mile. When you get done, see if you feel more creative. I always do – every time!

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events. Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

 

 

how to establish influence at a new job

How to Establish Influence at a New Job

So you’ve got a new job. Congrats! But now you face the challenge of adapting to your new workplace and building your reputation and influence within the organization. This can be a pretty daunting task to even the most seasoned supervisors and employees, but it’s important that you dive right in and start carving out your role and reputation without delay.

As you concentrate on mastering the tasks required during the first few weeks of your new position, it’s important that you also gain an understanding of how the organization works as whole and determine the cultural dynamics of the workforce. This will help you gain momentum quickly as you work to build legitimate influence and provide measurable value in your new position.

Here are some tips for doing just that:

1. Become the go-to person for whatever you do

When you introduce yourself to other people within your new organization, you should establish yourself as an authority in your position and offer to be of assistance. When you make the introduction, explain what your role and responsibilities are and why others should come to you when they need assistance with something in your realm of expertise. Once you’ve build yourself up as an authority in one particular area, people will start establish influence at a new jobseeking you out for assistance even in areas outside of your job description. The goal is to be in demand because of how good you are at whatever you do.

2. Make friends in high places

Seek out people who are well respected in your new organization This person could be your direct superior, a project manager or others who are well respected regardless of their position or length of service. Arrange time to chat, and let them know that you’d love to have their advice as you acclimate to your new position. Having an influential person in a mentorship or coaching role will help you to build your skills and influence. Start with your new boss; it’s always a good idea to find ways to help them meet or exceed their goals.

3. Really listen to coworkers

Get to know your coworkers and their goals, challenges, and responsibilities. Find ways to help them be successful. Go out of your way to help them when they need assistance. You can only build influence if you have the admiration and respect of the people that you work with. But remember: this isn’t about building paybacks due to you; it’s about being seen as an invaluable resource.

4. Invest constantly in your most important product – YOU

Work each day on improving your skills in these critical areas.

  • Core business, administrative and time management skills
  • Technical skills required of your current position and desired future positions
  • Interpersonal and communications skills

All three areas are critical to your success. Study, practice, ask for help, and improve every day. Let others will see how dedicated you are to mastering your number one product – YOU!

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”