How to Avoid Burnout on the Job

How to Avoid Burnout on the Job

In our fast-paced society, there’s a lot of pressure to be constantly busy. But this isn’t necessarily good for us as humans. Sure, you’re going to have busier days or weeks come around, but you shouldn’t have to feel like you’re constantly pushing yourself to the limit every day. That’s how you put yourself on the fast track to burnout and breakdown.

Here are a few ways that you can avoid burning yourself out in your daily work life. It’s interesting that these same ideas also increase productivity and creativity.

  • Take short breaks more often. You don’t necessarily have to spend more time taking breaks during the day, but taking small breaks regularly throughout the day rather than one or two longer breaks is more likely How to Avoid Burnout on the Jobto help keep you refreshed. It will help you to break up the work day much better and give you a chance to recharge your attention span throughout the day. When you complete an important task, get up and take a five minute walk. Recharge your brain and your body at the same time.
  • When you’re away from work, be away from work. There are so many people who make the mistake of blurring the line between their work and home life. The minute you set the precedent of taking your work home with you is the minute that you start being always on the clock. It’s important to have time specifically reserved for relaxation and enjoyment. If you stay focused on work even after your work day comes to an end, you raise the probability of stressing yourself out very quickly.
  • Don’t bite off more than you can chew. You should definitely keep a daily to-do list handy so you can see what tasks you’ve got on your schedule. An added benefit of having this list is that it can help you to keep from over-scheduling yourself. At the end of your day, prepare tomorrow’s list. Then you’ll start right up with what’s important rather what is simply distracting busy work. And always celebrate crossing off completed tasks.
  • Delegate – even when it’s uncomfortable to do so. When things get really busy, ask for help. This can be especially difficult for the perfectionist. But it’s necessary. You simply can’t do everything, so you need people you can trust to help you out during your peak periods. This is especially important to keep in mind if you run your own business.

I completely understand that it can be hard to separate yourself from your work sometimes, but for your own personal sanity it’s important that you do it. These tips should help you out.

Got any questions, feedback or other ideas? Let me know.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

dress for success

Dressing for Success at Your Next Interview

Many business organizations have pushed aside formal dress codes, allowing for more relaxed work environments. But when preparing for an important interview, it’s always safest to assume that you should dress in a traditional, professional manner.

Here are some of my simplest tips for dressing to impress:

1) When in doubt, go conservative.

If you ever are on the edge as to whether or not clothing, jewelry or hairstyle selections are appropriate for an interview, it’s just plain safer to lean toward the more conservative choice. It’s better to be more formal than dress for successinformal – safer to be old-fashioned than outlandish. This might seem boring, but it’s your best bet. Show the potential employer the respect they deserve by dressing up. And if you find that they allow a more relaxed dress code, you can always adjust after you’ve landed the job.

2) Stick to solid colors.

In most cases, clothing colors shouldn’t be overly bright or flashy. Again, err on the side of conservatism. Certain colors and patterns may stick out too much or clash with the interviewer or organization’s ‘style’.

3) Be mindful of your hygiene.

Make sure your hair is tidy, your nails are trimmed, you’re freshly showered, and your shoes are shined. The last thing you want is to go into an important interview looking like you just rolled out of bed or came straight from the gym. First impressions are fairly or unfairly based very heavily on your appearance, so it’s important that you prepare yourself in this way. Don’t give them any reason to doubt your abilities or attention to detail.

4) Go light on the scents.

If you normally wear perfume, cologne or aftershave, make sure that you don’t go overboard. If you use too much, it could overwhelm the employer and make for an uncomfortable interview. You want their focus to be entirely on the interaction with you. This is not a time for distraction. Everyone reacts differently to perfume and cologne. Assume that your favorite scent may have a negative effect on others. When in doubt, leave it on the shelf or in your purse.

5) Make sure your clothes fit and are ready to go.

I can understand and appreciate that you might not wear your formal interview clothes very often, but at least try them on ion advance of the big day and make sure they fit properly. Especially if you have had recent weight change – which the stress of a job search can often cause. Knowing that you look your best is important both for your confidence and your comfort throughout the interview. Make sure you look as great as you are.

Follow these five common sense tips, and you look your best at your next interview.

It can’t hurt and may very well help.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

battle plan for auditors

How to Be Productive With Your Job Hunt

There’s no getting around it: hunting for jobs is a pain. It’s time consuming, stressful and occasionally disheartening. Worst of all, it’s easy to lose focus, potentially keeping you unemployed for even longer.

However, there are certain steps you can take to be more productive with your job hunt and avoid losing focus. You’ve probably heard this before, but just in case: when you’re unemployed and searching for a job, you need to think of your job search as your full-time job. Treating your search this way makes it much more likely to yield results.

Here are some tips that you should consider:

  • Plan out your days. Just as you would with an average work day, plan out what your days look like while on the job hunt. You might reserve certain days for networking sessions, or set aside blocks of hours looking job huntingfor jobs online. You should also reserve time to tweak your resume, fill out applications, write letters, etc. Stay organized with your planning so that you start to get yourself into a routine; that makes it much easier to stay focused.
  • Track everything. Keep a thorough spreadsheet of all your job seeking activities. Track the jobs that you’ve applied for, when you applied for them, who your contact person was and when you followed up. You should also track all of the networking contacts you’ve made and when you had correspondence with them. Update this spreadsheet regularly to make sure that you’re staying organized.
  • Take advantage of technology. Use social networking or job hunting sites to your advantage. Many of them even have email alert systems when jobs that match your searches or your qualifications show up. You can get alerts as soon as listings are posted, so you can have an inside track on applications.
  • Revise your resume and cover letter for each application. You won’t find great results if you use the same generic resume and cover letter for every position you pursue. Research the target organization and what they’re looking for in an applicant so you have a better understanding of how to frame your application materials.
  • Keep your schedule arranged like you would at work. Get up early, stay well groomed and dressed, take lunch breaks and call an end to your job hunting activities by a certain time of the day. This will make your transition into your eventual new job a lot easier, and also keep you more productive during your search.

Getting that important work position is critical. Take these and other steps that each increase the probability of a successful pursuit. Good hunting!

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

personal network

How to Build Up Your Personal Network

Whether you’re unemployed, looking to move up the food chain in your office, or own your own business, it’s important to continually work on building your personal network. Having a large network will open the doors to many different opportunities in the business world.

Here are some simple ways that you can more effectively build up your personal and personal network:

  • Twitter, Facebook, and Other Social Media Tools. By now, pretty much everyone in business knows the benefit to having an active social media presence. Social media is an efficient way to interact with thought personal networkleaders, inform others of your capabilities, and establish yourself as an expert. Build lists of influential people in your industry and profession – and interact with them. ‘Like’ their posts, comment on their blogs, ask questions and offer solutions. Be mindful that these tools can be suck up an enormous amount of your valuable time, so be efficient. Limit your time, focus your efforts, and move on to other equally valuable networking opportunities.
  • Find online groups. It’s amazing how many professionals join social networks like LinkedIn and don’t make use of the groups features. Facebook and LinkedIn in particular have specialty groups for just about every industry or profession specifically designed for idea sharing and networking. Active participation in these groups is an efficient way to both find new people to follow and network with and to build your own reputation as an expert in your field. As appropriate, offer your assistance and expertise to others. Most will reciprocate and willingly help you as well.
  • Attend meet ups. Keep an eye on those online groups for information about meet ups, as well as websites like meetup.com. You can find meet ups for basically any type of business interest, or organize your own. These meet ups are great networking opportunities.
  • Seek out new people at social events. Even if you’re not talking business at social gatherings, you never know when someone new you meet will need assistance with something related to your business or personal skills. Be open and friendly with everyone you meet, and make sure you’re approachable. If you sense a business opportunity, politely express your interest in following-up later at a more appropriate time.

Block out a few minutes every day for proactive networking. Make and pursue professional connections whenever you have the chance. With each new connection, you increase your own probability of finding success.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”

Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength indicates that self-control is actually one of the most important factors in finding success. Unfortunately, we all know just how hard it can be to maintain steady levels of self-control – especially when we’re stressed, pressed, tired or confused.

Improve Your Self-Control

A recent study done by the authors of the book Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength indicates that self-control is actually one of the most important factors in finding success. Unfortunately, we all know just how hard it can be to maintain steady levels of self-control – especially when we’re stressed, pressed, tired or confused.

Here are a few tricks I use to improve the control when things get tough:

  • Know your limits. Remember: there’s only so much energy, willpower and capacity you have. If you are constantly pushing yourself to the limit, you’ll burn yourself out and push back at others. Any machine that runs at or above 100% capacity will break down, and you will too. Balance is one of the most powerful words in any language. We simply must balance all-out efforts with recharge time. Professional athletes do it, and you should too.
  • Consciously exercise willpower. Think of your will or drive to succeed like you would any muscle in your body. The more you exercise it, the stronger it will become. Find simple ways to exercise your willpower Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength indicates that self-control is actually one of the most important factors in finding success. Unfortunately, we all know just how hard it can be to maintain steady levels of self-control – especially when we’re stressed, pressed, tired or confused.in your everyday life, and you’ll increase your capacity for self-control.
  • Track your goals. It’s hard to maintain control if you’re not tracking progress. Keep budgets if you’re attempting to save money Track the calories you’re consuming if you’re trying to control your diet. Target and get enough sleep. Very simply: measures matter. They tell us when we’re on track or off the rails, and can help us regain focus quickly when the critical pushes aside the important.
  • Create and use daily ‘to-do’ lists. Creating daily lists of what needs to be done is common sense, but not common practice. Prioritized lists keep us pointed in the right direction from morning until night. Your last task each day should be the creation of the next day’s list. You’ll start your day fresh, organized and focused. Try this simple self-control tool for a week and I promise you’ll see how it will help reduce your stress while increasing your productivity.
  • Walk away from distractions. You don’t necessarily need to force yourself to complete a task; just make sure you put yourself in an environment where you can avoid potential distractions. The fewer distractions that surround you, the easier it will be to maintain control and complete the projects you have. Try this: only one task on your desk at a time. Everything else is placed where you can’t see it until your are done with what has to be done right now.

Self-control can be learned, exercised and mastered – even for those of us who have been in the work world for some time.

Start today with these five ideas. Let me know how they work for you.

John J. Hall, CPA

John J. Hall, CPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

John J. Hall, CPA, is an author, speaker and results expert who presents around the world at conventions, corporate meetings and association events.

Throughout his 35-year career as a business consultant, corporate executive and professional speaker, John has helped organizations and individuals achieve measurable results. He inspires audience members in corporations, not-for-profit organizations and professional associations to step up, take action and “do what you can.”